Société de transport de Saguenay (STS) drivers voice their anger at rally

This morning, a group of bus drivers with the Société de transport de Saguenay held a demonstration in support of their union executive in their fierce struggle against the STS.

This action is part of pressure tactics up to and including strike action, which 98.8% of the membership voted in favour of last July. The 125 bus drivers have been without a collective agreement since December 31, 2016.

The Syndicat des chauffeurs d’autobus de Saguenay-SCFP 3124 is fighting the reduction of transit service in several areas of the City of Saguenay.

Drivers of the Société de transport de Saguenay (STS) voice their anger at rally

This morning, a group of bus drivers with the Société de transport de Saguenay held a demonstration in support of their union executive in their fierce struggle against the STS.

This action is part of pressure tactics up to and including strike action, which 98.8% of the membership voted in favour of last July. The 125 bus drivers have been without a collective agreement since December 31, 2016.

The Syndicat des chauffeurs d’autobus de Saguenay-SCFP 3124 is fighting the reduction of transit service in several areas of the City of Saguenay.

CUPE Task Force on Governance survey available online now

CUPE members are invited to participate in a new online survey on governance.

At our 2017 National Convention, delegates adopted Resolution 36, which called for the creation of a Task Force on Governance to “conduct a comprehensive review of the governance and structure of our National Union.”

In March 2018, our National Executive Board confirmed the Task Force, which is made up of eight NEB members and eight CUPE activists who serve in elected positions at other levels of our union.

Victory for local democracy as Court strikes down Bill 5

Following today’s decision by Justice Belobaba to strike down key portions of Bill 5, CUPE Ontario’s President Fred Hahn praised the thousands of Ontarians who took part in the campaign to protect local democracy.

Bill 5 attempted to cut the size of Toronto city council by close to half months after candidates had already been registered, raised money and asked volunteers to work hard on their behalf. The bill was rammed through the legislature in the dead of summer, leaving many in other communities wondering if they’ll be next.

Ford Government directive seeks to control freedom of expression on Ontario campuses

The Ford Government has announced that Ontario colleges and universities must comply with new, arbitrary free speech rules or face funding cuts.
 
Premier Ford has unilaterally forced post-secondary institutions to define the terms of permissible speech on campus by January 1, 2019. Ford further urges these public institutions to punish individual students if they are found to be in violation of the new rules around free expression.
 

Election night coverage in jeopardy at TVA Montreal

Negotiations to renew the collective agreement of the unionized employees of the Groupe TVA took a new turn at noon today when employees stormed out of the workplace. This demonstration caused a blockage on de Maisonneuve Blvd. in front of the TVA building.

One billboard truck blared the following message, “Negotiations are dragging on at TVA. No agreement means no election night coverage!”

Halifax crossing guards ratify new contract

On September 4, crossing guards voted 99 per cent in favour of a new collective agreement with their employer, the Halifax Regional Municipality. The crossing guards are members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 4814.

The agreement was reached through conciliation on August 21, 2018.

Local 4814 members will receive a 9.8 per cent wage increase over the term of the three-year agreement. Other improvements include job security and extended use of vacation days.

What’s happened to federal funding for post-secondary education?

In the last few decades, the federal government has significantly reduced its funding for post-secondary education (PSE). The consequences have been devastating: increased tuition fees, corporatization, precarious work, bigger class sizes, and outdated infrastructure.

Following the Second World War, Canadian governments were the most important funders of post-secondary education, providing more than 80 per cent of college and university revenue. But over the past two decades that has changed. More of the cost has shifted to students and to wealthy donors.

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